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Japanese design studio Nendo recreates the impossible world of M.C. Escher in an immersive exhibition at The National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. (All photography by Eugene Hyland)

I have gathered a posy of other men’s flowers, and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.” — Michel de Montaigne

Since I started using Twitter, I have created a library of well over 20,000 blog posts, articles, talks, thoughts and ideas on subjects ranging from developmental psychology, social anthropology and cognitive science to architecture, art and philosophy. It is, in the words of the French philosopher Michel de Montaigne, “a posy of other men’s flowers” with my curiosity as “the thread that binds them.” The myriad connections and combinations become explicit through my work with senior executives and leadership teams. …


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“We believe that in using modern structural solutions and techniques, mapped against the historical records, that we’ve managed to pare the shrine back to its original form, to show it as it should be shown.” — ABOUT, a Japanese architecture firm led by Tadahiro Butsugan, has renovated a building that forms part of the Mekari Shrine (和布刈神社) in Japan’s Fukuoka prefecture (Photograph by Takumi Ota).

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Big Tech’s business model is doing irreparable harm to society, but we don’t need to destroy the tech giants; in 1995, a WIRED cofounder challenged a Luddite-loving doomsayer to a prescient wager on tech and civilization’s fate; how the internet tycoons used the ideology of flatness to hoover up value and no one seemed to care; to change the way you think, change the way you see; why Epicureanism is the philosophy we need now; the rule of awkward silence; light as a mirror that reflects the culture of place; the great architecture of the Thapar University Learning Laboratory in India; and, finally, Mary Catherine Bateson on humility, one of the most essential elements of human wisdom. …


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David Chipperfield Architects’ renovation of Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie, one of the icons of twentieth-century architecture, nears completion — “The refurbishment does not represent a new interpretation, but rather a respectful repair of this landmark of the International Style,” explained the studio. (Photograph by Thomas Bruns)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In the first edition of 2021: The phrase ‘adult beginner’ can sound patronising, but learning is not just for the young; as machine learning continues to develop, the intuition that thinking necessarily precedes learning should wane; how to forfeit unrealistic optimism about the future; talking out loud to yourself; how to channel boredom; the massive effect culture has on how we view ourselves and how we are perceived by others; unlocking the key to a mysterious 17th-century painting; and, finally, Lao Tzu and finding the answers at the center of your being. …


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The incredible contrast between the old Siheyuan structures and MAD’s daring new architecture is felt throughout, augmenting an already progressive kids’ learning experience. “The ‘borderless’ learning space, ubiquitous reading environment, and curriculum focusing on learning through exploratory play, not only enriches the interaction between children, but also allows teaching and learning to take place in an optimal atmosphere,” the firm explains. (Source: Best of 2020: Top 10 Architecture Projects of the Year) — YueCheng Courtyard Kindergarten (2020), Beijing, by MAD.

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In 2020’s final curation: Imagining our alternate selves can be fuel for fantasy or fodder for regret; the future posing as today’s speculative solutions to yesterday’s wicked problems; Søren Kierkegaard wants us to put our trust in the unfolding moment of life; the four thinkers who reinvented philosophy; philosophy is a practice; an organic and simple way to find your life’s purpose; Bob Dylan and the aura of a work of art; how did Balthasar become black?; …


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Jura limestone wraps around the concrete interiors of David Chipperfield Architects’ long-awaited extension for the Kunsthaus Zürich. The building’s monolithic form takes its cues from the city’s 19th-century cantonal school at the north of the site and is intended to provide the square with a “clear urban edge.” (Photograph courtesy of Dezeen)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: What hunter-gatherer societies can teach us about work, time and happiness; mind-wandering and why it pays to play around; win seeking a means to heal our wounded planet, look to the painstaking, cautious craft of art conservation; finding balance and belonging through direct experience of life’s wholeness; Beethoven’s masterful use of small motifs; a linguistic outpost, surrounded by alien sounds; the loneliness of urban life; and, finally, John le Carré’s consistent love. …


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“Once you come close to the renovated Museum of Fine Arts, Steven Holl has you in his hold. From the time you approach the new translucent glass façade, you are under his spell,” Nick Mafi writes in The 11 Most Anticipated Buildings of the Year. (Photograph: The Nancy and Rich Kinder Building by Steven Holl Architects, photograph by Richard Barnes)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Video conferencing offers an illusory sense of unilateral control over conversations; replacing oppressive and meaningless work with work that actually enhances peoples’ lives; how we have come to esteem financial value over human value; consuming media is as much about managing feeling as accessing information; Cole Porter’s new kind of American lyric — and language; what we know of Sappho; Apollo’s archaic torso; and, finally, why it’s so important to expose the underlying structure of the so-called ‘free market.’ …


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Architecture studios B+H Architects, 3XN and Zhubo Design have revealed the design for a natural history museum that will be built in Shenzhen, China. The three studios’ competition-winning project, which is entitled Delta, was designed to have a curved, flowing shape that resembles the flowing form of a river. (Illustration courtesy of 3XN)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: We have become more trusting of immediate technosolutionist thinking to solve complex, evolving problems; how ‘doing technology well’ contributes to our hopes for leading an ethically good life; when personal productivity meets digital surveillance, it does real harm to workers; will we miss shared working spaces more than we think?; …


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The Red Roof in Quang Ngai, Vietnam, by TAA Design, has won the Dezeen Awards 2020 architecture project of the year. It also won in the rural house of the year category. The house “invents a new typology, which addresses issues we face in the world today, where the urban is spilling into the rural,” said judge Sally Mackereth. (Photograph courtesy of the architects)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Uplifting and “delightfully concrete” advice on how to cope with a dark Corona winter; what we miss when we forget Africa’s great thinkers; how in the new capitalist model, the company with the most funding wins; the enduring timelessness of Japanese aesthetics; how close is too close in a time of social distancing?; …


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Shulin Architectural Design has created a serene reading space for the residents of the Liangjiashan village, located in an ancient mountain forest in China‘s Wuyi county. Aimed at providing a calm and quite place for children, young people, and the elderly, it incorporates a semi-outdoor open space on the ground level while the upper floor encloses two rounds of back-shaped bookshelves and several reading areas. (Photograph by Yilong Zhao)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: how understanding the structure of global cabal theories can shed light on their allure — and inherent falsehood; what it take to drive the ‘digital media’ Fury back to the Underworld; embracing contradictory ideas may be the secret to creativity and leadership; how close is humanity to the edge?; how art sustains us when survival is uncertain; lockdown has affected our memory; what does philosophy actually do?; …


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Emerging from its heritage legacy below, Piccolo House in South Melbourne, by Wood Marsh Architecture, is “spurred by its contextual considerations. Sheathed in an ordered monolith of off-form concrete, precision cut-outs are subtly angled to reveal coloured reflective glass elements that reinterpret the autumnal tones of the brickwork in the neighbouring laneway. Akin to a block of stone being carved into, the mass references the lintel as a symbol of strength providing the structural framework for the building.” (Photograph by Trevor Mein)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Is collapse ‘really is a matter of when’ or ‘more of a guy thing’?; …

About

Mark Storm

helping leaders navigate complexity with confidence & clarity of thought | varius multiplex multiformis

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