Japanese design studio Nendo recreates the impossible world of M.C. Escher in an immersive exhibition at The National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. (All photography by Eugene Hyland)

I have gathered a posy of other men’s flowers, and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.” — Michel de Montaigne

Since I started using Twitter, I have created a library of more than 25,000 articles, talks, thoughts and ideas on subjects ranging from developmental psychology, social anthropology and cognitive science to architecture, art and philosophy. It is, in the words of the French philosopher Michel de Montaigne, “a posy of other men’s flowers” with my meandering curiosity as “the thread that binds them.” The myriad connections and combinations become explicit through my work with senior executives…


Tasked to redesign the WW II memorial monument for the submarine Uredd, Haugen/Zohar Arkitekter created Uredd Rest Area, a striking rest area in Ureddplassen (which in Norwegian means a ‘fearless place’), a frequently visited site just along the Norwegian Scenic Route Helgelandskysten. An idyllic place to admire Aurora Borealis in winter and the midnight sun during summer, the architects wanted to honour the area’s views of the fjords and the Norwegian ocean while satisfying the architectural quality and public service requirements of the project. (Photograph by Statens Vegvesen)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: How the belief in a ‘true self’ affects the way we behave and see the world; talking out loud to yourself is a technology for thinking; we must embrace the age-old idea of Arcadia and reform our stewardship of the earth; why read the classics?; …


Georges Batzios Architects restores a rare example of Greek brutalist architecture, designed in the 1970s by Alexandros Tombazi — According to Batzios, the overhaul was “a moral challenge.” (Photograph by Giorgos Sfakianakis)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Asian literature can show us how to live well in troubled times; ideas about machine intelligence in both East and West still reflect some key cultural divides; we fear and yearn for ‘the singularity’ but it will probably never come; the awe before there are words; Prometheus’ toolbox; when your authenticity is an act, something’s gone wrong; the opposite of placelessness…


“After 20 years of frantic city-building, rustic China is in a death spiral. Now architects are helping to reverse the exodus — with inspirational tofu factories, rice wine distilleries and lotus tea plants,” Oliver Wainwright writes in China’s rural revolution: the architects rescuing its villages from oblivion. (Photograph: DnA’s Tofu Factory in Caizhai Village, China, is operated by a “villager union […] to engage family workshops as shareholders of this collective economic entity.” Photography by Ziling Wang)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: The fragility of the gig economy’s promise to ‘work flexibly’; imagination is a powerful tool, a sixth sense, a weapon; if your goal is to become a better person, and to help others do likewise, virtue ethics is the name of the game; Petrarch and the virtues of the quiet life; Diogenes and the difficulty for social critics; the latest must-have…


53 Units, Low-Rise Apartments, Social Housing in Saint-Nazaire, France, by the Pritzker Architecture Prize 2021 Laureates Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal — “This low-income development consists of 53 units organized in a series of three-story buildings, each with six apartments. The units include private gardens for each ground-floor residence and balconies or winter gardens on those of the upper floors. The architects’ use of transparent, retractable polycarbonate panels and insulating thermal curtains throughout the interior rooms create comfortable environments full of light that are also ecologically and economically responsible.” (Photograph by Philippe Ruault)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Wherever you are in life, whatever your character, you are always going to be a work in progress; a moon shot model for the transformation of capitalism; according to Pritzker 2021-winners Lacaton & Vassal, “transformation is the opportunity of doing more and better with what is already existing”; the disquieting rise of the tiny home; the lost art of listening; Ovid’s…


The Hill House Box Museum, by Carmody Groarke — “Rather than incarcerate the house away from view whilst the restoration is undertaken, a more radical approach to active conservation has been taken. As an integral part of this process of conservation, which it is thought will take up to 15 years, the project places a ‘big-box’ temporary museum on the site to contain and protect [Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s] The Hill House as an ‘artefact,’ whilst also maintaining access to the house for visitors.” (Photograph by Johan Dehlin)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: How virtue ethics helps us navigate the complex and often frightening world; how do we go about finding a meaningful life, not just a happy one?; the difference between ambivalence and ambiguity; ‘aimai,’ the Japanese concept of ambiguity; what is philosophy?; …


Imagine Montessori School in Paterna, València, by Gradolí & Sanz Arquitectes — “The project grows like an organism, each cell acquires its shape according to its needs and then regroups and interacts with the other cells. Once the classrooms have been arranged in a fan, the space of relationship that unites them is not only a functional place of passage, but, with its extensions, its corners and its balconies and walkways over the outdoor patio, it becomes a meeting space, work and play. An agora turned to the outside puts an end to this journey of spaces of relationship.“ (Photograph by Mariela Apollonio)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: How the metaphors we live by shape our experience; wonder — the linchpin of inspiration and inquiry — makes humans unique; art can shatter the façade we put up for others; the differences between happiness and meaning in life; the history of the colour blue; Goethe and how the Greeks saw their world; the joy of seeing Venice’s Renaissance beauty again…


Waterfront Clubhouse by Abin Design Studio is a concrete pavilion overlooking a lake in Adisaptagram, West Bengal, India — “The project is a search, from social existence to the dynamics of space and form, to the beauty of light and shadow to the striking a harmony with nature,” according to the website of the Kolkata-based architecture studio, founded in 2005 by Abin Chaudhuri. (Photograph by Edmund Sumner)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: Literature is a machine that accelerates the human brain; science is simply assumed to reign supreme; in the age of Wikipedia, is it better to study everything?; …


Kuopio Museum in Kuopio, Finland, by Architects Davidsson Tarkela — The extension “rises between the lavish architecture of the early 20th century and the disciplined, structured architecture of the 1960s in this new cultural quarter.” (Photograph by Marko Huttunen)

Reading notes is a weekly curation of my tweets. It is, as Michel de Montaigne so beautifully wrote, “a posy of other men’s flowers and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own.”

In this week’s edition: The only possible way to construct genuinely sustainable homes is by placing them in a constant conversation with their surroundings; extending human habitability to outer space requires learning to live more carefully and sensitively as a species interlocked with others; the pandemic has highlighted the cost of neglecting public investment, both in the welfare state and value creation; the social construction…


“Only in 1997, when the Bilbao Guggenheim opened to worldwide acclaim, Gehry’s blend of energy and competence, and his ability to bring a unique architectural vision to reality were finally recognised. He was sixty-nine,” Philip Delves Broughton writes in How to Think Like an Entrepreneur. (Photograph: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, 1997, by Frank Gehry. Courtesy of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain

“If anyone can refute me — show me I’m making a mistake or looking at things from the wrong perspective — I’ll gladly change. It’s the truth I’m after, and the truth never harmed anyone. What harms us is to persist in self-deceit and ignorance.” — Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 6:21 (translated by Gregory Hays, The Modern Library, New York)

Frank Gehry and moving between fields

Philip Delves Broughton’s How to Think Like an Entrepreneur (The School of Life/Pan Macmillan, 2016) contains a moving chapter, entitled The Old Man and the Fish, about the Canadian-born American architect Frank Gehry.

Delves Broughton writes how Gehry, after graduating from…

Mark Storm

helping senior executives and leadership teams navigate complexity with confidence & clarity of thought

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