Random finds (2016, week 8) — On disruption, leadership and Umberto Eco’s antilibrary

Disrupt no more

In 2014, Jill Lepore, staff writer of The New Yorker and professor of history at Harvard, wrote a devastating takedown of fellow Harvard professor Clayton Christensen’s disruption theory (The Disruption Machine: What the Gospel of Innovation Gets Wrong).

  • Clayton Christensen Responds to New Yorker Takedown of Disruptive Innovation (Bloomberg): http://goo.gl/QItZsi.
  • On Disruption: Jill Lepore’s Timely Rebuttal of Clay Christensen (H-Diplo Essay): https://goo.gl/b0Vy6o.
  • What Jill Lepore Gets Wrong About Clayton Christensen and Disruptive Innovation (Forbes): http://goo.gl/XaM1Hv.

What is leadership, anyway?

Joshua Rothman wrote a terrific article in, again, The New Yorker, titled Shut Up and Sit Down: Why the leadership industry rules.

A bit more…

Brainpickings remembered Umberto Eco with an (earlier) article about Eco’s antilibrary — or how to become an antischolar in a culture that treats knowledge as ‘an ornament that allows us to rise in the pecking order.’ In it, Maria Papova cites Nassim Nicholas Taleb who uses Eco’s uncommon relationship with books and reading as a parable of the most fruitful relationship with knowledge (The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable):

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Mark Storm

Mark Storm

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Helping people in leadership positions make sense — one conversation at the time